Mar 30 2011

Living Wills And Power Of Attorney

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 3:29 am

A coherent patient basically has the right to make an autonomous decision regarding health care. He or she may decide to refuse or accept any form of medical treatment in the event of an illness or trauma. However, when coherence is absent, the duty is typically passed on to the patient’s immediate family or the health care provider. This is when the concepts of living wills and power of attorney become significant.

For as long as you’re competent and rational, only you can decide what medical intervention to accept. Needless to say, you also have the right to decline treatment based on your personal beliefs and preferences. The usual scenario would include a thorough explanation from your attending physicians as regards to the advantages and disadvantages of a particular medication or procedure. Yet, regardless of your reasons, the health care provider is obligated to grant your refusal to receive medical care.

On the other hand, if you become incapacitated due to a permanent disability or a terminal illness, you may lose the right and ability to decide for your own medical treatment. In this case, the important determinations will have to be made on your behalf. And if you haven’t formulated any instructions, no one will truly know what you would have wanted to happen.

Consequently, the health care team and your immediate family will have to work with professional judgment and presumptions about your condition. So before it’s too late, learn about living wills and power of attorney and how they can make the situation a lot easier for and your family.

Living Will

A living will is a legally binding document that allows you to express your wishes in writing with regard to medical treatment. It normally contains instructions as to how you want to be taken care of in the event of a debilitating illness or a permanent vegetative condition.

More often than not, two witnesses are required to observe the signing of this legal document. A number of states even necessitate the presence of a Notary Public. Apart from that, the living will should be consistent with

the laws of the state on the subject of advance directives.

Is everything making sense so far? If not, I’m sure that with just a little more reading, all the facts will fall into place.

Since it is a legal document, the health care provider and your immediate family would be compelled to put your wishes into action. On top of that, a living will would certainly guarantee that your decisions about your medical treatment would be respected no matter what happens.

Power of Attorney

A power of attorney used in health care enables you ? the creator ? to name an advocate in the event of your illness or incapacity. This person would serve as your proxy in the decision-making pertaining to your medical care. Of course, your advocate should have full knowledge of what you intend or desire to happen in case you become too debilitated to actually speak or decide for yourself.

Certain qualifications and conditions must be fulfilled before a person can be named as your advocate. For instance, he or she must be of legal age ? eighteen years old and above ? and must only have your best interest in mind. You may pick your spouse, son, daughter, sibling, a friend, or any trusted person to act as your health care representative.

In case you want your advocate to be able to decline any medical treatment and permit you to pass away peacefully, you must specifically say so in writing.

Although the drafting of a power of attorney is not necessarily required, you have to remember that the legal authority of your representative will only take effect after you have duly signed the said document.

So choose between living wills and power of attorney, and try to determine which of the two would work best for you.

Now might be a good time to write down the main points covered above. The phentermine act of putting it down on paper will help you remember what’s important about Living Wills.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO


Mar 24 2011

Living Wills And The Extent Of Your Options

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 5:52 am

you will be able to specify which of these measures you wish to receive or refuse in the event of incapacitation. Also, it would be a good idea to speak with your physician about this matter and be advised on other pertinent issues and terminologies.

The Different Treatments

1) Resuscitation

This procedure aims to restart a heart that has stopped beating. Decide on when and if you wish to be resuscitated via CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) or by a medical device that dispenses an electrical shock to revive the heart. The stage of a disease or the extent of injury matters in this situation.

Therefore, try to be as specific as possible. You may fill out medical forms called DNR (do-not-resuscitate) orders to signify your desire to refuse such life-saving measure. These forms are usually attached to the medical record to forewarn the health care team.

2) Mechanical Ventilation

This life-sustaining measure involves the use of a machine that takes over a person’s ventilation in the event that he or she is incapable of spontaneous breathing. Reflect about when, if and for how long you would like to be attached to a mechanical ventilator.

You can see that there’s practical value in learning more about Living Wills. Can you think of ways to apply what’s been covered so far?

You should also take your prognosis and condition into account, and whether or not it would matter to you if the doctors have high hopes about your recovery.

3) Hydration and Nutritional Assistance

These life-prolonging measures provide the body with much needed fluids and nutrients intravenously or through a nasogastric tube (NGT). Come to a decision about when, if and for how long you would like to receive sustenance in this manner.

4) Dialysis

In case of renal failure, this medical procedure gets rid of toxic wastes from your blood and controls fluid levels in your body.

Decide on when, if and for how long you would like to accept this treatment.

5) End-of-life Care

Examples of treatment that fall under this category include the administration of painkillers, antibiotics, and mechanical ventilation. You should also determine whether you would like to receive these palliative measures even when death is imminent.

In general, these medical interventions can provide help in temporary situations wherein recovery is possible. However, in end-of-life stages, such measures could only add further discomfort and prolong the dying process.

A lot of conditions may fall someplace in between, where the odds of recuperation is unknown. These circumstances are often difficult to deal with. When living wills are present, however, these problematical situations are made a lot easier.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Mar 17 2011

Massachusetts Living Wills 101

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 11:02 pm

In today’s world, it seems that almost any topic is open for debate. While I was gathering facts for this article, I was quite surprised to find some of the issues I thought were settled are actually still being openly discussed.

Living wills notifies others about the medical treatment you wish to receive or refuse if you become terminally ill or permanently comatose and incapable of communicating your decisions. Duly ratified state laws regulate all living wills in the United States ? except New York, Michigan and Massachusetts living wills.

These statutes aim to safeguard a person’s right to say no to medical interventions. In most states, these documents are legally binding and can assure that an attending physician who implements patient’s wishes will be free from any liability.

What is a Living Will?

A living will is a written document that is legally binding and would take effect only when the creator becomes incapacitated to make autonomous and informed decisions about his or her medical care. If you decide to make one, you can specifically express your wishes with regard to what types of treatment you want to receive or decline.

A lot of people prefer to steer clear of life-sustaining interventions that only function in prolonging life without improving its quality. They can definitely make their objections clear by writing a living will. On the other hand, individuals who want to express their preference to receive all types of medical treatment ? to sustain life and consequently delay death ? may do so through this legal document.

The instructions ? or advanced directives ? contained in a living will are typically designed to take effect if you fall into any of the following circumstances:

1) terminal illness

You can see that there’s practical value in learning more about Living Wills. Can you think of ways to apply what’s been covered so far?

2) persistent vegetative state (PVS) or permanent coma

3) conscious yet with permanent brain damage and will in no way recover the capacity to make autonomous decisions and/or convey your wishes

In the creation of a living will, the common law states that for as long as the person is competent to determine for himself/herself, he or she possesses the right of self-determination. It basically means that only the person can decide what type of treatment will be done unto him or her. Integrated into the right of self-determination is the right to accept/decline medical intervention.

Courts all over the country have maintained that the advance directives or living will drawn up by an able individual should be respected even when he or she is no longer considered competent. In 1990, the Supreme Court released a definition of what a “competent person” really is. According to the statement, he or she has the autonomy to refuse treatment under the constitution’s due process clause.

Although it is common to see advanced directives that attempt to cover a wide range of situations, it is still a better idea to express your health care wishes specifically. You may even spell the words out in the document or plan a small discussion with your health care team about the matter.

The substantiation of both written and verbal proof aids in ensuring that your wishes will actually be carried out. Some examples of common interventions that you should deal with include artificial hydration and nutrition, cardiac resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, pain medications, antibiotics, etc.

Massachusetts living wills possess the same features as that of a standard living will. However, due to the lack of state laws that govern the creation of application of this legal document, certain features may be absent.

Then again, what matters the most is not the add-ons but the typical functions and benefits they offer.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Mar 16 2011

Living Wills: How To Plan For The Future

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 7:34 pm

Illness, severe injury and death are delicate subjects that are not easy to talk about. The main thing though is that by preparing in advance you can make sure that you receive the kind ? or extent ? of medical treatment you want.

If you want to take full advantage of the benefits of living wills, you should at least have a serious talk with your family, your close friends and your doctor.

The most excellent approach would be to discuss these matters in a reassuring and factual manner.

The important conversation should include your philosophy about health care and the things you would want done in certain situations. In case your wishes are faced with intense moral opposition from your immediate family and/or friends, you may consider selecting or appointing someone more in line with your point of view as your health care surrogate. In this way, you will be assured that your surrogate will make decisions that are in accordance with your beliefs.

On the other hand, if you want to speak to your family or friends with the proposition that they also create a living will, be sure to prepare a good explanation to back it all up. You should put in plain words the importance of planning ahead and how these documents could be of assistance in very bad situations.

Without living wills, families could be torn apart and wrecked emotionally while trying to reach a consensus about what would be best for their seriously ill loved one. If this possibility seems unbearable for you to picture out, then make your mind up about whether to create a living will or not. You can never tell what will happen to you a year from now, next month, or perhaps tomorrow. So you might as well be safe than sorry for not making the right choice as early as possible.

If you don’t have accurate details regarding Living Wills, then you might make a bad choice on the subject. Don’t let that happen: keep reading.

Taking Care of the Paperwork

Since these documents are supposed to be legally binding, make sure that everything is put in writing. Every state has its own set of policies regarding this matter. The law in one state, concerning living wills, may not be consistent with that of another state.

You can get hold of the proper forms through your doctor or your health care provider. You can also visit various sites on the Internet to procure state-specific forms, complete with instructions on how you should properly fill them out. In addition, a variety of organizations ? such as the National Hospital and Palliative Care Organization ? also offers appropriate living will forms that are free of charge.

Then again, if you don’t mind shelling out some cash, you may seek advice from an attorney about this matter. This can be a wise move, especially if you have plans of transferring to another state ? with a different set of rules concerning such legal documents.

Once you have completed the proper forms, hand copies of the living will to your immediate family members, friends, and family doctor. If you have appointed your own health care surrogate, don’t forget furnish him or her with a copy as well.

On no account should living wills be stashed in a safe deposit box. Doing so will only make it harder for your loved ones to get hold of the document when the need arises.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Mar 06 2011

The Details Of California Living Will Forms

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 11:52 pm

The California Probate Code Section 4701 regulates all types of advance health care directive in the state. If you have plans about making one for yourself, you may want to get to know what California living will forms are all about and what they normally contain.

Basically, a living will is a legal document that contains advance directives with regard to medical treatment. The form, once properly signed and filled out, becomes legally binding and takes effect in case of hospitalization ? particularly if the patient falls into an awful and incapacitated condition.

For its contents to be acknowledged and implemented by a health care provider, the drafting of the living will should be consistent with the rules of the state regarding such documents.

In the state of California, you ? as well as its entire populace ? have the right to give out advance directive about your own medical care. In addition, you are entitled to appoint a particular person to act as your advocate or surrogate in making treatment decisions in case you fall into a persistent coma or terminal illness.

Several other rights are indicated in the state-specific form. So before you actually draw up your living will, try to be familiar with your options first ? including the specific contents and parts of the appropriate health care directive form.

The “Part 1″ of the living will form is the Power of Attorney. It allows you to assign another person ? called a health care surrogate ? to formulate health care determinations on your behalf in the event that you become incapable of participating in the decision-making process. Then again, your surrogate may also assume the responsibility in case you demonstrate or express unwillingness to decide for your own medical treatment.

The best time to learn about Living Wills is before you’re in the thick of things. Wise readers will keep reading to earn some valuable Living Wills experience while it’s still free.

Just to be sure, you may also appoint an alternate surrogate to take on the task of deciding on your behalf in case your original choice is not around or unwilling to perform his or her duties. Obviously, your health care surrogate must not be an employee/operator of the health care facility you are receiving care from ? except if he or she is a co-worker or a relative.

Unless your living will explicitly restricts the power of your health care surrogate, he or she may formulate all types of medical treatment decisions for you.

If you wish to impose such limitations in authority, you may do so by indicating that wish in writing. Then again, if you intend to be completely dependent on that person’s ability to choose what is best for you, then placing restrictions would be pointless.

“Part 2″ of the living will form permits you to provide detailed instructions pertaining to any facet of your medical care ? with or without a health care surrogate. Options are typically supplied to you so that you can properly covey your desires concerning the withholding, withdrawal or provision of treatment to prolong your life. This also includes pain relief measures ? or the lack thereof.

Appropriate space is also made available for you in case you want to write down additional instructions that are not presented in the choices. However, if you’ve already appointed a health care surrogate and is quite confident about his or her decision-making abilities, then completing this part of the living will form would not be necessary.

The third part of the form allows you to state your intent to donate your organs and/or tissues in the event of your death. “Part 4″, on the other hand, lets you select and name the physician who will be primarily responsible for your health care and treatment.

After accomplishing the correct form, the date and your signature should be affixed at the end of the document. Aside from that, the law that regulates California living will forms essentially requires the presence of two eligible witnesses or a Notary Public during the signing. You also have the right to annul or alter the contents of the living will at any time.

Sometimes it’s tough to sort out all the details related to this subject, but I’m positive you’ll have no trouble making sense of the information presented above.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Mar 02 2011

Differentiating A Living Will And A Living Trust

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 3:16 pm

The following article presents the very latest information on Living Wills. If you have a particular interest in Living Wills, then this informative article is required reading.

The two terms living will and living trust may seem a bit vague. Oftentimes, people may even use them interchangeably. However, you have to understand that a living will is certainly different from a living trust. Although both may share a number of similar characteristics, you have to know their exact definitions for you to be able to fully utilize them to your advantage.

Living Will

It is a legal document that states your wishes regarding health care decisions in the event of an unfortunate occurrence such as a terminal illness or a permanent vegetative state. This form of advanced directive will only take effect once you have shown evidence of incapacity to participate in the decision-making process with regard to your medical treatment.

Basically, the policies that govern the making and application of living wills are based on state laws concerning the matter. The statutes may hold differing views from one state to another. So be sure to follow state-specific procedures to avoid conflicts since this is, after all, a lawful document.

Other states may not have particular laws pertaining to living wills. Then again, you may take advantage of the option to appoint a health care surrogate in case you become too ill to participate in making health care decisions for yourself. As the name implies, your surrogate will act and decide on your behalf under the mentioned circumstances.

Living Trust

In essence, a living trust is a written lawful document that partly takes the place of a will. It allows you to place all your assets (i.e. residential properties, bank accounts, or stock shares) in a trust to be administered to your advantage for as long as you live.

In the unfortunate event of your death, all your properties will be transferred under the names of your beneficiaries.

It seems like new information is discovered about something every day. And the topic of Living Wills is no exception. Keep reading to get more fresh news about Living Wills.

Most people opt to appoint themselves as the trustee in command of supervising all the assets of the trust. In this fashion, you can still be in control of your properties even though they’ve already been put into a trust. On the other hand, you may also assign a successor trustee ? either an institution or a person ? to administer the trust’s assets in case you become unwilling or incapable of performing your duties.

So basically a living trust guarantees that your assets will be handled according to your preferences ? that is if you become incapable of managing them yourself. In setting one up, you may initially want to serve as its trustee. However, it would be best if you also select a successor trustee while you’re still of sound mind to make the decision.

The trustee may take over the management of all your assets under the mentioned circumstances. And in case you pass away, the successor trustee you have appointed will act similarly to an executor of a will.

The usual functions will include gathering your assets; paying any remaining debts, taxes and claims; and distributing your properties according to your orders. Then again, unlike a will, all of these tasks may be carried out without court approval or supervision.

In comparison to a living will, a living trust is not normally considered a top priority and not everyone would benefit a great deal from it. For instance, a young couple without kids and noteworthy assets do not require the creation of a living trust. People with uncomplicated estate plans may not gain much from it too.

On the other hand, wealthy individuals who prefer court supervision for the management of their estate should steer clear from living trusts.

So you see, a living will and a living trust definitely differ in a lot of ways. The first is usually appropriate for almost anyone, while the latter is typically viewed in a case-to-case basis.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO


Feb 27 2011

The Limitations and Alternatives of Missouri Living Wills

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 5:06 am

The following article lists some simple, informative tips that will help you have a better experience with Living Wills.

A living will is a legal statement or declaration that a person can make signifying his or her desire to withhold or withdraw certain types of medical treatment under a number of circumstances. Missouri living wills also function in the same way.

Any competent resident of Missouri who is 18 years or older can draft a living will by affixing his or her signature and the exact date to the declaration. This must be done in the presence of two qualified witnesses.

A witness must be at least 18 years of age and should not have nay relation to the creator of the living will. He or she should not be a beneficiary of or monetarily responsible for the health care of the creator.

The making of a living will or other forms of advance directives is highly recommended since it prepares a person for that grim possibility of incapacitation. Plus, it provides an excellent opportunity to formulate health care decisions with much thought and free of pressure.

The Limitations of Missouri Living Wills

While most folks have heard about living wills, not all are actually aware of the substantial limitations of the document as defined by the laws of Missouri. The terms “terminal condition” or “death-prolonging procedure” are utilized in the statute to indicate the circumstances to which the declaration applies.

The law defines these terms with reference to a condition wherein death is about to happen whether certain treatments are given or not. In other words, the patient is expected to pass away within a short period of time with or without resuscitation, mechanical ventilator, artificial nutrition/hydration, and/or surgical procedure.

The best time to learn about Living Wills is before you’re in the thick of things. Wise readers will keep reading to earn some valuable Living Wills experience while it’s still free.

By definition, a living will only steers clear of treatment when the prospect of death is unquestionable and the medications or procedures are ineffective in preventing or significantly postponing death. In addition, the statute forbids a living will from withdrawing or withholding artificial nutrition or hydration ? which is nourishment supplied through an intravenous line or feeding tube.

The Alternatives to Missouri Living Wills

For people who want to express health care decisions that are beyond the bounds of Missouri statutes about living wills, there is a possible alternative. This option is also known as “advance directives.” The legal declaration contains a patient’s desire to withhold or withdraw certain medical treatments prior to suffering from a debilitating condition wherein the ability to communicate is not possible.

In the absence of an advance directive, once a person becomes debilitated, he or she could lose the right to self-determination. Missouri living wills are just a form advance directive, complete with its own benefits and limitations. Nevertheless, latest court cases have made it obvious that any competent person has the right to create other forms of advance directives that go beyond the restrictions of the living will law.

The alternative directives need to be convincing and clear, and may contain instructions with regard to the withdrawal or withholding of artificial nourishment or other life-sustaining measures that could keep the patient in a persistent vegetative state.

The contents of this written and legally binding document may be modified according to the creator’s preferences and needs. For instance, it can specify that certain measures may be done for a sensible timetable and then terminated if the expected outcome is not observed.

Know that the creation of advance directives follow certain similar policies as that of Missouri living wills. The documents also need to be signed and dated in the presence of two qualified witnesses in order to make them legal.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, proud owner of this top ranked web hosting reseller site: GVO


Feb 25 2011

Ohio Living Wills And Other Advance Directives

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 4:45 am

provides a person with the option of refusing resuscitation in case of a respiratory or cardiac arrest. By signing up for this program, the patient will be given the choice to pass away devoid of any “heroic measures”.

On the other hand, the health care institution will be furnished with lawful means to acknowledge those wishes. If you prefer to kick the bucket in this manner, then you must first register with a medical practitioner and have suitable forms of Do-Not-Resuscitate identification.

You actually have a lot of choices on the subject of health care decision-making. So don’t leave yourself in the dark when it comes to Ohio living wills and other advance directives.

Don’t limit yourself by refusing to learn the details about Living Wills.

The more you know, the easier it will be to focus on what’s important.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Feb 21 2011

Exploring The Contents Of Living Wills

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 8:51 am

can be easily stripped off of you in the face of incapacitation.

Some people would refuse to receive life-prolonging measures if the most wanted quality of life cannot be brought back. Others, however, would prefer the exact opposite.

Whichever option a person would choose, let it be known that it is his or her right to come to a decision with regard to health care. Nevertheless, if the ability to communicate his or her preferences is taken away, then that is where the serious difficulty starts ? the determination of whether to prolong life the life of a loved one or not.

The wide variety of disabilities leaves the contents of living wills more vulnerable to disputes between doctors, family members and patients. More often than not, people hold different points of view and expectations with regard to serious medical conditions. In addition, some types of permanent infirmities and chronic ailments are more manageable compared to others and should basically be viewed on a case-to-case basis.

If you find yourself confused by what you’ve read to this point, don’t despair. Everything should be crystal clear by the time you finish.

A living will should contain the kind of circumstances a person would wish to endure. They should be in writing and should be defined in specific terms using the following criteria: type of illness or injury, severity, and prognosis (particularly pertaining to irreversibility or permanence).

On top of that, the narrative should be comprehensible and purely medical. Steer clear of statements like “I do not want to be in a persistently hopeless state” as they are more unclear compared to straightforwardly saying no to the application of a mechanical ventilator.

In general, it takes a considerable amount of time to precisely determine if a patient will remain in bad shape permanently or if a certain degree of recovery is probable. In a lot of cases, a definitive diagnosis is usually formed after weeks of close observation. A person’s medical condition, however, may change without warning ? either for the better or for the worse. That is why it is vital not to indicate time restrictions in your living will.

Instead, build your request or refusal for treatment on the possibility of recovery, the probability of enduring discomfort or pain, and the professional opinion of the attending physicians. Other causes of treatment refusal may include the lack of merit for the risk or pain, and the distressing state of treatments (i.e. hemodialysis sessions).

Although the contents of living wills are similar in most cases, the state laws may involve several additions or specifications in the forms. For this reason, it would also be an excellent idea to gain knowledge about state-specific policies.

There’s no doubt that the topic of Living Wills can be fascinating. If you still have unanswered questions about Living Wills, you may find what you’re looking for in the next article.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO


Feb 19 2011

Living Wills: Putting Your Refusal Into Writing

Category: Living WillsAnders Eriksson @ 5:13 pm

The current medical advances have made it possible for health care providers to artificially prolong life. To some people, the notion of hooking their loved ones to a life support system may be not be agreeable especially if there is no definite chance of recovery from the debilitating condition.

However, a lot of folks strongly believe in the inviolability of life. And unless the patient himself or herself wills the termination of life-prolonging measures, no one has the right to pull the plug. Then again, the only way that this would happen is through the use of living wills.

You may not initially welcome the concept of living wills. But as you try to weigh the pros and cons, you will begin to realize that it is not a bad idea after all. A great deal of planning and preparation is your best option if you want your hospital care to turn out the way you want to ? even if it involves pulling the plug for all forms of artificial life support. In addition, putting your wishes into writing is the right path to take in this particular situation.

Possible Reasons For Refusal of Treatment

There may be a million of different reasons why people would want to refuse medical treatment. Then again, most of these rationales may be placed under two broad categories. The first one basically involves the overall benefit of the medical intervention. If the advantage of a particular medication or procedure is not huge enough to substantiate the associated discomfort and risk, then the patient may decide not to receive such measures.

Is everything making sense so far? If not, I’m sure that with just a little more reading, all the facts will fall into place.

Even though most folks would be willing to undergo a number of risky and unpleasant treatments in order to live longer, this statistics should not be viewed as the basis for the medical care of all patients ? particularly those that do not have living wills. Some people actually prefer a shorter and more comfortable life, especially if the quality is significantly compromised.

The second probable reason for the refusal of medical treatment would be the existence of intolerable circumstances. In spite of the simplicity and tolerability of a particular life-sustaining intervention ? such as a nasogastric tube (NGT) feeding, some may say no to it in the presence of an irreversible condition like a persistent vegetative state.

When viewed in this light, the life-prolonging measures may be met with completely atypical decisions. The treatment would then be perceived to lengthen the period of suffering, for both the patient and immediate family.

Even though some decisions fall effortlessly under one of the two broad categories, others just would not fit below any. Based on the circumstances present, the term “medical treatment” may involve the use of ventilation tubes (inserted into the chest or neck), the administration of antibiotics or any drug with a high probability of success. Benefit/burden decision-making in these situations could bring about different choices.

If you want certain treatments to be withheld when you’re no longer able to decide for yourself, you should specify them in your living will. Numerous health care declarations or living wills contain instructions intended for doctors to deny the provision of “life-sustaining treatments” or “extraordinary care”.

These directives are often difficult to interpret correctly and are less likely to be followed than those that are more detailed.

Now you can understand why there’s a growing interest in Living Wills. When people start looking for more information about Living Wills, you’ll be in a position to meet their needs.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his top ranked GVO affiliate site: GVO



Next Page »