Oct 04 2011

The Rich Tradition of Thailand?s Ivory Carving

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 4:05 am

The best course of action to take sometimes isn’t clear until you’ve listed and considered your alternatives. The following paragraphs should help clue you in to what the experts think is significant.

The “white elephant” (white only in some areas of the body) is sacred in Thailand. To classify it as sacred, an elephant should also be genteel in demeanor. If an elephant meets these criteria, it will belong by law to the King of Thailand.

Other elephants were very important in Thai life. They were used in war, transport, and work. The ban logging in 1989 left many elephants unemployed. However, their use to humankind did not cease. Today, both Asian and African elephants are near-extinction largely because the ivory trade. Together with habitat loss, these were the major causes of the steep decline. In 2001, Thailand was reported to have more than more than 88,000 worked ivory items for sale. These items were smuggled in from Africa, Myanmar and China.

Ivory carving in Thailand was done through hand tools such as saws, files, chisels, gauges, farmers, awls, and drills until the late 1970s. The need for mass production to meet a higher demand led ivory workshops to use electric tools such as ban saws, grinders, lathes, and buffers.

If your Ivory facts are out-of-date, how will that affect your actions and decisions? Make certain you don’t let important Ivory information slip by you.

Buddhas, animals, and King Rama V are the three subjects done only by a skilled Thai master carver. Most Thai craftsmen, which include women, specialize in specific tasks or subject. It should be noted though that versatility is an important characteristic of skilled carvers. In Thai ivory carving, the best raw ivory is used for the larger figurines, carved tusks and name seals. The poorest ivory is for pendants, amulets, necklaces, and rosary beads; whereas the good ones are used for the bangles and carved bracelets.

Popular aesthetic sculptures in Thailand are composed of religious subjects such as the Buddha, various mythological creatures, chess pieces, and bindings for palm-leaf Buddhist scriptures. Notable examples of these were carved in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. These were housed in the National Museum in Bangkok. These best pieces were carved by craftsmen from the royal palace or those patronized by powerful families.

They say the quality of Thai ivory carving declined as consumers shifted from royalty and the noble class to tourists and businessmen. A large part of this is due to pressure on meeting higher demand but with small amount of time allotted on every piece. This was the result of mass production where priority is placed on quantity and not on quality. Before, craftsmen spend months carving a single piece using hand tools. Mass-market electric tool reduced the time, at the same time the attention a carver spends on individual items.

To date, there are about 2,000 domesticated elephants in Thailand. However, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is a worldwide ban on ivory trade. Locally, the government also implemented the ?Elephant Law? that protects the specie from near-extinction.

With an extensive international and local pressure to ban ivory sales, livelihoods of around 120 carvers in the country adversely affected. For instance, the shift from ivory to cow bone carving decreased the income of one workshop from an average of $500 a month to $150 a month.

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Sep 27 2011

Insightful Guide about the Good Sources of Ivory

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 6:43 pm

It is a known fact that original ivories are the ones that come from the teeth of elephants and teeth and tusks of the wooly mammoth. This doesn?t mean that these are the only sources of such object because this can also be acquired on the tusks and teeth of walrus, such as the Pacific Walrus, which tusks grow up to five centimeters and are elongated. Its teeth come in irregularly round form. This object can also be acquired on the beak of the Helmeted Hornbill.

Such object is a good source of artistic pieces and precious materials. This is why many people, especially the hobbyists and collectors who are getting engaged in collecting anything that is made from such. If you want to start on this, you have to make sure that you only acquire the legal types. It is a fact that hunting elephants for their tusks and teeth has already been banned since the 70s. It is now illegal to buy pieces and things that come from the tusks of the elephants that have been gathered after the ban has been imposed. You need to look for the types that come from ancient elephants or from the extinct wooly mammoth

Here?s a detailed look into the other sources of this popular and most sought after object.

The more authentic information about Ivory you know, the more likely people are to consider

you a Ivory expert. Read on for even more Ivory facts that you can share.

In the Arctic regions, people have long found out that this element can be found on walrus. The activity has been in existence since the prehistoric era. The carving and engraving of such material that is made from the tusks and teeth of walrus are common in the Inuit clans in Greenland and North America, the clans of Chukchi and Koryak that can be found around the continent of Russia. This animal is a good source of the material because the tusks of the Walrus are elongated with the average size of around 5 centimeters in length. Its teeth got the irregular round shape. The enamel on its tusk coating will wear out as the animal grows in age and in size and it will develop cracks.

This material can also be obtained from the Warthog, such as the common kinds that can be found in many parts of Africa. The size of this animal is about three to five feet and its weight can be from 100 up to about 300 pounds and beyond. This animal?s tusks and teeth are used to dig and also serve as their defense mechanism that helps them survive. Their upper protruding teeth can get up to about nine inches in length and the lower set is shorter.

The Helmeted Hornbill is another good source of this object. This is a large bird that flocks on the islands of Sumatra, Borneo and Malay. Carving objects that are made from this material can be rooted in the Ming Dynasty of China, the cultural artistic expressions in Japan and the carving activities in Netsuke that dates back 300 years ago.

With so many sources of ivory, you have lots of options about the materials that will help you from getting tempted in getting unlawful types.

You can’t predict when knowing something extra about Ivory will come in handy. If you learned anything new about Ivory in this article, you should file the article where you can find it again.

About the Author
For all the latest articles and information on Investing In Silver please visit Silver News Today


Sep 27 2011

How to Care for Your Antique Ivory

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 6:05 am

An organic material with a high moisture absorption rate and high sensitivity to temperature changes, ivory naturally undergoes changes in its appearance over time. Ivory may get either bigger or smaller as it ages. Also, the surface of ivory eventually turns into yellow or a darker color, which is a sign of the material?s aging. Such a new color must be preserved to make the ivory?s beauty last for a longer time and to prevent it from losing its value. Thus, you have to take good care of your antique ivory so that it won?t succumb to discoloration or damage.
The following are basic tips to ensure that your ivory keeps its exquisite look for many years.

? Protect the ivory from extreme and constantly changing weather conditions. Ivory should be stored in a place with just the right moisture level (45 to 55 percent) and temperature (65 to 72 degrees Celsius). Particularly, the ivory should be kept away from cold windows, direct sunlight, attics, basements, outside walls, and other humid areas.

? Be sure that the moisture level does not go beyond 70 percent. Otherwise, your ivory will get damaged due to mildew and mold formation, swelling, or warping. Exposure to high humidity level can also cause black spots to develop on the ivory?s surface.

? Before cleaning the ivory, make sure you test a small portion first to check if it will have adverse reaction to the cleaning method you are going to use.

If you base what you do on inaccurate information, you might be unpleasantly surprised by the consequences. Make sure you get the whole Ivory story from informed sources.

? Also, you have to wash your hands first to get rid of dirt and oil before you proceed to cleaning the ivory. Preferably, use white gloves while cleaning the ivory to prevent staining its surface.

? Never use liquids such as water and cleaning solutions to clean ivory pieces since they might cause cracking or swelling.

? The proper way to clean ivory is to brush dirt off using a clean and soft toothbrush or paintbrush.

For stubborn dirt, you can mix distilled water and ethyl alcohol and use the solution on a piece of paper towel. Allow the ivory piece to dry right away. When it has already dried, buff the ivory with a soft, clean cloth.

? Your ivory has to be hydrated to keep it from drying out and becoming brittle with age. It is recommended that you wrap your ivory items in a soft cloth soaked in glycerin or mineral oil every six months. You may also apply light vegetable oil directly on the surface of the ivory, let the oil stay overnight, and wipe it off in the morning.

? If you?re not sure you can handle the maintenance of your ivory on your own, it is better to consult or leave the job to a professional ivory conservator.
Don?t let your precious antique ivory become a thing of the past. Handle it with utmost care and clean it regularly. With proper and careful maintenance, you can keep your ivory pieces in good condition in the long term.

That’s the latest from the Ivory authorities. Once you’re familiar with these ideas, you’ll be ready to move to the next level.

About the Author
By Anders Eriksson, feel free to visit his Perpetual20 training site for great bonuses: Perpetual20


Sep 18 2011

The Course of Africa?s Ivory Trade

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 10:27 pm

This article explains a few things about Ivory, and if you’re interested, then this is worth reading, because you can never tell what you don’t know.

The current population of African elephant is about 600,000 down from about 1.2 million in 1979. Why? It is because of the exploitation of elephants for their ivory and skin. Hence, a sharp increase in elephant poaching, including illicit ivory trade, across Africa in the recent years.

The illegal harvesting of elephants is known as elephant poaching. It was already proven that poaching has caused the decimation of elephant population by almost half between the years of 1979 to 1989. This was the time when an elephant can yield $3, 600 for the middlemen while the average worker?s wage is no more than $1, 000 annually.

Elephant poaching happens because the state lacks enforcement and monitoring; the animals have no clear cut property rights also. In 1978, African elephant was placed on Appendix II of the Convention for International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) because of the decline of its population and its economic value. The Appendix II regulates commercial trade and provides restriction on what is detrimental to the species.

The United States and many European nations imposed a moratorium on ivory imports in June 1989 to save the remaining elephant populations. The African elephant was added to Appendix I in October. The Appendix I ban trade in the products of African elephants and other species threatened by extinction. Such world ivory trading ban was implemented on January 18, 1990. African nations such as Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, Malawi and South Africa took reservations. They even formed the South African Center for Ivory Marketing (SACIM). This organization has not functioned yet because of lack of buyers.

However, the trade ban had varying effects depending on the state. All players involved in the poaching business and ivory trade such as producers, entrepots, and consumers have different incentives to comply with the ban. These incentives actually are in conflict with each other. That?s why; the ivory trade failed in some aspects. Since then, the illicit ivory trade has continued despite policy efforts.

Those of you not familiar with the latest on Ivory now have at least a basic understanding. But there’s more to come.

The Space for Elephants (SEF) said illicit ivory trade has increased since 2004 and shoot up in 2009. Even the research of Elephant Trade Information System supported SEF?s claims. SEF found that the volume of illicit ivory capture doubled between 2008 and 2009. Kenya and Democratic Republic of Congo are recorded as countries having the large numbers of elephant poaching, which were run by well-organized crime syndicates supplying the elephant demand especially in Asia.

The Kenyan government reported around 232 victims of poachers in 2009?up from 145 in 2008. Meanwhile in Congo, the Congolese military struggles to cope with poaching activity. In this country, rebels are believed to be involved in poaching and selling ivory.

These numbers showed the severity of poaching in Africa today than in 1990′s. Experts estimated an 8 to 10% of Africa’s elephants being killed every year to supply the growing demand for ivory. This level of poaching is incomparable in the 1980′s before the world ivory trading ban implementation.

What is apparent in the history of elephant poaching and illicit ivory trade in Africa is that states in conflict and corruption are in no position to enforce laws controlling the illicit trade in ivory. For example, the abovementioned failure of the world ivory trading ban in 1990. The cultural and economic factors, particularly in Asia, also contribute to the rampant illicit ivory trade because of its ever present and continuing demand for ivory products.

Today, many studies projected that with that rate of elephant poaching there is a possibility of extinction by 2010. The elephant poaching and illicit ivory trades have been the main concerns for the 15th CITES? Conference of Parties.

Don’t limit yourself by refusing to learn the details about Ivory. The more you know, the easier it will be to focus on what’s important.

About the Author
By Sylvia Richards. For more articles, products and services please visit spiritual, psychic, healing, aromatherapy, mind, body, spirit


Sep 16 2011

The Course of Africa?s Ivory Trade

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 10:39 pm

The current population of African elephant is about 600,000 down from about 1.2 million in 1979. Why? It is because of the exploitation of elephants for their ivory and skin. Hence, a sharp increase in elephant poaching, including illicit ivory trade, across Africa in the recent years.

The illegal harvesting of elephants is known as elephant poaching. It was already proven that poaching has caused the decimation of elephant population by almost half between the years of 1979 to 1989. This was the time when an elephant can yield $3, 600 for the middlemen while the average worker?s wage is no more than $1, 000 annually.

Elephant poaching happens because the state lacks enforcement and monitoring; the animals have no clear cut property rights also. In 1978, African elephant was placed on Appendix II of the Convention for International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) because of the decline of its population and its economic value. The Appendix II regulates commercial trade and provides restriction on what is detrimental to the species.

The United States and many European nations imposed a moratorium on ivory imports in June 1989 to save the remaining elephant populations. The African elephant was added to Appendix I in October. The Appendix I ban trade in the products of African elephants and other species threatened by extinction. Such world ivory trading ban was implemented on January 18, 1990. African nations such as Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, Malawi and South Africa took reservations. They even formed the South African Center for Ivory Marketing (SACIM). This organization has not functioned yet because of lack of buyers.

However, the trade ban had varying effects depending on the state. All players involved in the poaching business and ivory trade such as producers, entrepots, and consumers have different incentives to comply with the ban. These incentives actually are in conflict with each other. That?s why; the ivory trade failed in some aspects. Since then, the illicit ivory trade has continued despite policy efforts.

How can you put a limit on learning more? The next section may contain that one little bit of wisdom that changes everything.

The Space for Elephants (SEF) said illicit ivory trade has increased since 2004 and shoot up in 2009. Even the research of Elephant Trade Information System supported SEF?s claims. SEF found that the volume of illicit ivory capture doubled between 2008 and 2009. Kenya and Democratic Republic of Congo are recorded as countries having the large numbers of elephant poaching, which were run by well-organized crime syndicates supplying the elephant demand especially in Asia.

The Kenyan government reported around 232 victims of poachers in 2009?up from 145 in 2008. Meanwhile in Congo, the Congolese military struggles to cope with poaching activity. In this country, rebels are believed to be involved in poaching and selling ivory.

These numbers showed the severity of poaching in Africa today than in 1990′s. Experts estimated an 8 to 10% of Africa’s elephants being killed every year to supply the growing demand for ivory.

This level of poaching is incomparable in the 1980′s before the world ivory trading ban implementation.

What is apparent in the history of elephant poaching and illicit ivory trade in Africa is that states in conflict and corruption are in no position to enforce laws controlling the illicit trade in ivory. For example, the abovementioned failure of the world ivory trading ban in 1990. The cultural and economic factors, particularly in Asia, also contribute to the rampant illicit ivory trade because of its ever present and continuing demand for ivory products.

Today, many studies projected that with that rate of elephant poaching there is a possibility of extinction by 2010. The elephant poaching and illicit ivory trades have been the main concerns for the 15th CITES? Conference of Parties.

Sometimes it’s tough to sort out all the details related to this subject, but I’m positive you’ll have no trouble making sense of the information presented above.

About the Author
By Chris Meagher, feel free to visit his top ranked Online Dating Information site: Find Your Partner Online


Sep 15 2011

Looking into the Beauty and Uses of Ivory

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 4:17 am

Due to near-extinction of elephants, ivory trade is banned globally since 1989 through listing of elephants on Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

The steep increase of illegal ivory trade has continued until today because of the rising demand in East Asia and the mass production of ivory carvings. This is because ivory carving has been an artistic tradition in Eastern countries such as Myanmar and Thailand. But what is ivory exactly and why it has been an important part of human history?

Ivory is obtained from the elephant?s tusks or its upper incisors. It is hard and smooth substance mainly consists of dentin. The word came from Ancient Egyptian ?abu? that means elephant. While the word is commonly associated to the tusks of elephants, it was expanded to include the tusks and teeth of other animals such as walruses, hippopotamuses, and whales. Popular terms also include Genuine French Ivory and Indian Ivory which are imitation ivory.

A main component of ivory, dentin is one of the four main components of teeth and tusks. It is largely made up of mineralized connective tissue and collagen. Both teeth and tusks are almost the same, even in origin. Teeth are used for food chewing, whereas tusks are modified teeth projecting beyond the lips. Elephant tusks are formed with a partial cap of enamel that eventually wears away, leaving the dentin exposed.

Once you begin to move beyond basic background information, you begin to realize that there’s more to Ivory than you may have first thought.

The ivory of animals differs in several aspects. The African elephant ivory differ from the Asian ones. The former is harder with a translucent yellow appearance. The former is softer with an opaque white appearance.

The beauty and smoothness of an elephant ivory lie on the Lines of Retzius or Lines of Schregar. These are visible in cross section which appears to be intersecting lines with a diamond shape between them. An elephant ivory is easily carved and durable. Unlike elephant ivory, the hippopotamus ivory is denser and harder to carve. The Walrus ivory has a primary and secondary dentin layer with the latter having a marbled facade.

Hence, ivory is used in making high valuable works of art, valuable religious items, and ornamented boxes For example, the Chinese valued ivory for both art and utilitarian objects such as images of Buddhist and Taoist deities and opium pipes.

Ivory carvings also flourished in other Asian countries like Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia.

These countries traditionally harvested ivory from domesticated elephants to make containers and carved into elaborate seals for government use.

Today, synthetic substitutes for ivory were developed to meet the continuing demand of it and address the rapid decline of elephant population. Examples of ivory imitation are materials made from cellulose nitrate, hard nut?also called vegetable ivory, and casein, which is a phosphoprotein that composes nearly 80 percent of proteins in milk and cheese. The differences between the two are the lack of irregular canal lines and that natural ivory fluoresce a bright blue under the sun while synthetic a dull blue.

About the Author
By John Hanks, feel free to visit this top ranked crime stopping affiliate site: the thief,home security,security,deals


Sep 11 2011

History of Myanmar?s Ivory Carving

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 5:47 pm

Ivory carving has also flourished in Myanmar like Thailand, a well-known country of elephants. In the 13th century when Marco Polo went to Burma, he described the country as teeming with elephants, rhinos and other wild beasts. But unlike Thailand, there was no evidence that ivory was used either in the north or south of country until the 19th century.

Although elephants were widely used in extracting logs from the forest during the Pagan Kingdom and the Toungoo Dynasty, today?s artifacts and available historical information have not indicated any existence of iron carving during these period. The British diplomatic mission, whom deployed by the British colonizers in late 19th century, reported an existence of ivory production in two remote tribal areas in Kachin State in the north and mentioned a small paper-knife used to squeeze on ceremonial headdresses and tuck away hair.

The earliest dated item made from ivory was an ivory chair crafted for King Thibaw in 1878. Today, it is housed in the National Museum collections in Yangon. Historians estimate the beginning of ivory carving in the 1860s in the court of Kind Mindon with U Oh, Uhmyin, and U Maun. They were the only known ivory craftsmen in Mandalay. Oral histories mentioned the name U Saya Ohn too as a famous carver in Rangoon, also around the 1860s. He is known as the trainer of first generation ivory carvers and the master of the three best carvers in Mandalay.

In Burmese language, ivory carving is called ?sinswe pan pu.? Pan pu refers to wood carving, which is one of the pan sai myo or ?ten arts.? Historians approximate that ivory carving in Lower Burma was inspired by British colonizers and Indian traders. Meanwhile, ivory carving in Upper Burma flourished in the Court of Ava in the same decade. However, there was no collection having refined carving skills.

Ivory carving in Burma is associated with nobility and Buddhist church. In 1885 when Konbaung Dynasty ended, Mandalay?s royal patronage also ended.

Ivory carvings are made mainly for the British and Indians immigrants.

Think about what you’ve read so far. Does it reinforce what you already know about Ivory? Or was there something completely new? What about the remaining paragraphs?

Ivory carving workshops were established in Moulmein (Mawlamyine) and Pyinmana in the south in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. But the Burmese ivory craftsmanship during this era was not highly praised and was not flourishing.

When Japan invaded Burma at the end of 1941, it developed the ivory industry. During the Japanese colonization, there were around 56 ivory craftsmen in eight businesses in Mandalay. The Japanese soldiers were consumers of ivory chopsticks, combs, cigarette holders and cases. The Buddha figurine, which survives from 1942, showed the diversity of ivory carvers from jewelry to utilitarian materials, religious items, and decorations.

Even when the Japanese lost political power in Burma when World War II ended, ivory carving has continued in the country. Many ivory carvers passed down the tradition to their next generation. In the early 1970s when ivory-made materials became globally popular, the Burmese government brought tour groups to the country. But this did not benefit Tin Aung, a known ivory businessman.

When tourists started coming to the country, Tin Aung opened a second ivory shop in his expanded home and employed 17 carvers. As the ivory industry continued to flourish in the 1980s, competition of ivory businesses began and Tin Aung?s carvers went down to 7. In 1988, he closed down his two shops after the riots. He reopened his shop in 1990 and when he died a year after, no one carried on his business.

U Win Maung became one of the best and most successful ivory carvers in Myanmar. He was a specialist in human figurine carving and in staining to “antique” a piece. Then, he trained U Ba Pe who later became skilled carver and businessman in Yangoon. Today, there are only about seven ivory carvers left in Yangon. Others retired and some shifted to wood or moved to Mandalay. This is because acquiring raw ivory is too difficult to sustain ivory carvers. Most of the tusks in Myanmar are sold to Mandalay, Thailand or China.

Those who only know one or two facts about Ivory can be confused by misleading information. The best way to help those who are misled is to gently correct them with the truths you’re learning here.

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Sep 08 2011

How to Care for Your Antique Ivory

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 1:50 am

An organic material with a high moisture absorption rate and high sensitivity to temperature changes, ivory naturally undergoes changes in its appearance over time.

Ivory may get either bigger or smaller as it ages. Also, the surface of ivory eventually turns into yellow or a darker color, which is a sign of the material?s aging. Such a new color must be preserved to make the ivory?s beauty last for a longer time and to prevent it from losing its value. Thus, you have to take good care of your antique ivory so that it won?t succumb to discoloration or damage.
The following are basic tips to ensure that your ivory keeps its exquisite look for many years.

? Protect the ivory from extreme and constantly changing weather conditions. Ivory should be stored in a place with just the right moisture level (45 to 55 percent) and temperature (65 to 72 degrees Celsius). Particularly, the ivory should be kept away from cold windows, direct sunlight, attics, basements, outside walls, and other humid areas.

? Be sure that the moisture level does not go beyond 70 percent. Otherwise, your ivory will get damaged due to mildew and mold formation, swelling, or warping. Exposure to high humidity level can also cause black spots to develop on the ivory?s surface.

? Before cleaning the ivory, make sure you test a small portion first to check if it will have adverse reaction to the cleaning method you are going to use.

I trust that what you’ve read so far has been informative. The following section should go a long way toward clearing up any uncertainty that may remain.

? Also, you have to wash your hands first to get rid of dirt and oil before you proceed to cleaning the ivory. Preferably, use white gloves while cleaning the ivory to prevent staining its surface.

? Never use liquids such as water and cleaning solutions to clean ivory pieces since they might cause cracking or swelling.

? The proper way to clean ivory is to brush dirt off using a clean and soft toothbrush or paintbrush. For stubborn dirt, you can mix distilled water and ethyl alcohol and use the solution on a piece of paper towel. Allow the ivory piece to dry right away. When it has already dried, buff the ivory with a soft, clean cloth.

? Your ivory has to be hydrated to keep it from drying out and becoming brittle with age. It is recommended that you wrap your ivory items in a soft cloth soaked in glycerin or mineral oil every six months. You may also apply light vegetable oil directly on the surface of the ivory, let the oil stay overnight, and wipe it off in the morning.

? If you?re not sure you can handle the maintenance of your ivory on your own, it is better to consult or leave the job to a professional ivory conservator.
Don?t let your precious antique ivory become a thing of the past. Handle it with utmost care and clean it regularly. With proper and careful maintenance, you can keep your ivory pieces in good condition in the long term.

This article’s coverage of the information is as complete as it can be today. But you should always leave open the possibility that future research could uncover new facts.

About the Author
By Sylvia Richards. For more articles, products and services please visit spiritual, psychic, healing, aromatherapy, mind, body, spirit


Sep 02 2011

Vegetable Ivory: An Eco-Friendly Alternative to Elephant Ivory

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 5:28 am

The most common source of ivory in the world for many years is elephant ivory. Nowadays, the decreasing number of elephants (due to widespread slaughter for tusks), the growing concern for depleting elephant population, the ban on ivory trade, and the rising cost of ivory have led to the use of natural alternatives to and imitations of elephant ivory. One of the popular substitutes for ivory is the vegetable ivory. It is a special seed from Hyphaene Phytelephas, a palm tree that grows in the rain forest of the Amazon.

Also known as Tagua in South America, this alternative ivory has the same hardness and creamy color as real ivory, which is why it is considered the only substitute that?s completely sustainable for elephant ivory. Why is using ivory from a South American palm tree 100% sustainable? First and most importantly, it keeps elephants from being slaughtered for their tusks. Thus, it helps in stopping the extinction of elephants. Second, it does not require cutting down trees for farming, making it environmentally sustainable. It is possible to harvest the seed without damaging the tree or any wildlife. Lastly, it gives the South American economy a real boost because it provides jobs for thousands of people in that area.

Those of you not familiar with the latest on Ivory now have at least a basic understanding. But there’s more to come.

The Tagua plant produces ivory about three times a year, and this can last for many centuries. It can produce about 16 heads every year, with each containing 20 seeds. Tagua seeds are hand collected when their fruit pods, which hold the seeds, becomes ripe and falls. After the seeds have been harvested from the forest floor, they must be left to dry totally so that it will achieve the required hardness. The seeds are usually dried for about six weeks by exposing them to the sun. Once the Tagua seeds have hardened, their brown skin must be removed. Then the seeds can be cut, carved, dyed, or polished to make small attractive jewelry items such as blocks, discs, beads, and droplets. Aside from jewelry items, Tagua seeds are also made into figurines, buttons, toys, pins, and other small products.

Its beautiful color makes Tagua one of the commonly used materials for creating fashionable jewelry. Since it is lightweight and durable, Tagua is perfect for making earrings, necklaces, and other similar jewelry items. The advantage of using this kind of ivory is that it does not age?its color and shape will never change. That is why its value increases as it gets older. This is in contrast to true ivory that tend to stain or change in color over time.

The best thing about using jewelry from Tagua seeds is that they won?t cost you an arm and a leg. Unlike other types of ivory, this alternative ivory is less expensive.
Using vegetable ivory for jewelry and handicrafts is an eco-friendly and cost-effective alternative to true ivory, which comes from elephant tusks.

Consider this type of ivory if you need ivory but care about the diminishing population of the earth?s elephants.

If you’ve picked some pointers about Ivory that you can put into action, then by all means, do so. You won’t really be able to gain any benefits from your new knowledge if you don’t use it.

About the Author
John Kay is compiling a list of cool websites around the web. Here are the most interesting websites, some great money making websites and cool websites when bored.


Aug 30 2011

Frequently Asked Questions about Ivory: What You Need to Know

Category: IvoryAnders Eriksson @ 7:11 am

Have you ever wondered what exactly is up with Ivory? This informative report can give you an insight into everything you’ve ever wanted to know about Ivory.

What comes to your mind when you hear the word ivory? You might be thinking about the soap or the color, but real ivory is more than that. To know more about this beautiful and useful material, here are some of the frequently asked questions about ivory that might be interesting to you.

What Exactly is Ivory?

Ivory refers to the canines and tusks that are made up of an inner pulp cavity. This cavity is covered by dentin, which consists of collagen and connective tissues. The dentin is coated by a cementum layer, most of which are covered by an extra layer of enamel. It is dentine that’s used as a major component in ivory for inlays, carvings, and other items.

What are the Sources of Ivory?

Strictly speaking, real ivory comes from the tusks of Asian and African elephants as well as mammoths.

In general terms, large teeth and tusks from boars, hippos, walruses, and sperm whales are considered ivories. However, some people do not regard them as real ivories.

Some forms of ivory are known as imitation or faux ivory. They come from various sources such as casein, celluloid, and inner seeds of the Tagua palm tree.

Is Ivory an Organic Material?

You may not consider everything you just read to be crucial information about Ivory. But don’t be surprised if you find yourself recalling and using this very information in the next few days.

Ivory is both an organic and inorganic substance. The organic components of ivory are the collagen proteins, which work to repair and build tissues. On the other hand, the inorganic components are the mineralized tissues, which make ivory durable and hard.

How Do Ivory Types Differ?

To tell the difference between one type of ivory and another, it is important to understand the structure of natural ivory. Dentin has very small nerve canals that spread out to the cementum layer. These nerve canals look like irregular lines when the ivory has been carved and polished. How these lines are arranged vary among ivories, and they are used to determine the source of ivory. Aside from the lines, other characteristics like the dentin layer help one recognize the differences. For example, the so-called Lines of Schreger is exclusive only to the dentin of elephants and mammoths.

What is the Difference Between Genuine and Synthetic Ivories?

Synthetic ivory lacks irregular nerve canal lines. Good imitations have lines, but they follow a regular pattern. A foolproof method to find out if an ivory item is authentic or synthetic is through a UV light. Under UV light, true ivory will emit bright blue light, while synthetic ivory emits dull blue light.

What Happens to Ivory as It Ages?

In reaction to the fluctuating temperature and weather conditions, ivory easily absorbs and gives out moisture. This results in the swelling and shrinking of ivory. Worse, it may give in to warping or cracking. That is why it is important to place ivory in an area where humidity is low and the temperature does not quickly change. Ivory is also prone to staining over time.
These frequently asked questions about ivory gives ivory lovers more information they should learn about the characteristics and origin of ivory, as well as how to keep its beauty for a long time.

Now might be a good time to write down the main points covered above. The act of putting it down on paper will help you remember what’s important about Ivory.

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About the Author By Ian Stephens, feel free to visit his top ranked Club site:resell rights / plr



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